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English legal system / Steve Wilson ... [et al.].

Contributor(s): Wilson, Steve.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCall no.: KD661 .W54 2014Publication: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014Edition: 1st ed.Description: xlviii, 600 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780199669929 (pbk.); 0199669929 (pbk.).Subject(s): Law -- England | Law -- Wales
Contents:
1 Studying English legal system -- 1.1 From 'A' level to degree study -- 1.2 Advice on studying the English legal system -- 1.3 Lectures -- 1.4 Preparing for seminars or tutorials -- 1.5 Assessment -- 1.6 A note about group work -- 1.7 Oral presentations -- 1.8 Examinations -- 2 English legal system-an overview -- 2.1 What is law?-some basic ideas -- 2.2 Common law and equity -- 2.3 Parliament and legislation -- 2.4 Criminal law and civil law-terminology, differences, and themes -- 2.5 Classification of the courts -- 2.6 Legal personnel and bodies -- 3 Legislation and the law-making process -- 3.1 Parliament -- 3.2 Primary legislation -- 3.3 The passage of legislation through Parliament
3.4 Resolving inter-House conflicts using the Parliament Act procedure -- 3.5 Secondary legislation -- 4 The interpretation of statutes -- 4.1 Problems of language -- 4.2 Preliminary issues -- 4.3 The traditional approach to statutory interpretation -- 4.4 Aids to construction -- 4.5 Rules of language -- 4.6 Presumptions of statutory intent -- 4.7 Interpretation of legislation and the European Union -- 4.8 Interpretation of legislation and the Human Rights Act 1998 -- 5 The doctrine of judicial precedent -- 5.1 Judicial precedent and law reporting -- 5.2 Nature of judge-made law -- 5.3 Ratio decidendi -- 5.4 Obiter dicta -- 5.5 Nature of stare decisis -- 5.6 Methods of avoiding precedents -- 5.7 Nature of the rules of Judicial precedent
5.8 Case analysis -- 6 The law and institutions of the European Union -- 6.1 The History of the European Union -- 6.2 The institutions of the EU -- 6.3 Sources of EU law -- 6.4 The preliminary rulings procedure -- 6.5 Supremacy of EU law -- 6.6 Direct effect -- 6.7 State liability -- 7 Human rights and fundamental freedoms -- 7.1 The European Convention on Human Rights and the incorporation of Convention rights into UK law -- 7.2 Parliamentary sovereignty and the European Convention on Human Rights -- 7.3 Interpretation of legislation under section 3 -- 7.4 Declaration of incompatibility -- 7.5 Statements of compatibility in Parliament -- 7.6 Remedying incompatibility -- 7.7 The UK courts and the European Court of Human Rights
7.8 Unlawful for a public authority to act incompatibly with Convention rights -- 8 The Judiciary -- 8.1 The Judicial hierarchy -- 8.2 Appointment of the judiciary -- 8.3 Removal and retirement -- 8.4 Judicial independence -- 8.5 Governance of the judiciary -- 9 The legal profession -- 9.1 The legal profession -- 9.2 Solicitors -- 9.3 Barristers -- 9.4 Regulation of the professions and reform: The Clementi Review -- 9.5 Should the professions of barrister and solicitor be amalgamated? -- 9.6 Legal executives -- 9.7 Licened conveyancers -- 9.8 Paralegals -- 10 The jury -- 10.1 The role of the jury -- 10.2 The selection of the jury -- 10.3 Challenges to jury membership
10.4 Jury vetting -- 10.5 The ethnic composition of the jury -- 10.6 Jury intimidation or 'tampering' -- 10.7 Juries in serious fraud trials -- 10.8 Jury waiver -- 10.9 Jurors, social media, and the internet -- 10.10 Advantages of jury trials -- 10.11 Disadvantages -- 11 Access to justice -- 11.1 Legal Aid Agency -- 11.2 Civil Legal Advice Service -- 11.3 Criminal legal aid -- 11.4 Recent history of legal aid reform -- 12 The criminal process: the suspect and the police -- 12.1 The structure and organisation of the police -- 12.2 PACE and the Codes of Practice -- 12.3 Police powers to search, seize property, and make arrests -- 12.4 The suspect at the police station -- 12.5 Charging a detainee and the decision to prosecute
13 The criminal process: pre-trial and trial -- 13.1 The criminal courts of trial and the classification of offences -- 13.2 Instituting criminal proceedings -- 13.3 The Auld Review -- 13.4 The Criminal Procedure Rules 2013 -- 13.5 First hearings -- 13.6 Pre-trial hearings: summary only offences -- 13.7 Pre-trial hearings: either way offences -- 13.8 Pre-trial hearings: indictable only offences -- 13.9 Plea and Case Management Hearings in the Crown Court -- 13.10 Indictments -- 13.11 Plea bargaining -- 13.12 Bail -- 13.13 Pre-trial issues: disclosure -- 13.14 Trial on indictment -- 13.15 Summary trial -- 13.16 Evidential issues -- 13.17 Verdicts-- 14 Sentencing
14.1 Statutary provisions governing the sentencing of offenders -- 14.2 The purposes of sentencing -- 14.3 Maximum sentences -- 14.4 Determining the appropriate sentence -- 14.5 Newton hearings -- 14.6 Offences taken into consideration -- 14.7 Types of sentence -- 14.8 Sentencing youths -- 15 The civil process -- 15.1 The nature of civil proceedings -- 15.2 The Woolf reforms -- 15.3 The civil courts -- 15.4 Case management powers -- 15.5 Commencing civil proceedings -- 15.6 Responding to particulars of claim, acknowledgement of service, admissions, and default judgments -- 15.7 Allocation and case management tracks -- 15.8 The disclosure and inspection of documents
15.9 Part 36 offers -- 15.10 Qualified One Way Costs Shifting -- 15.11 Applying for court orders -- 15.12 Summary judgment -- 15.13 Civil trial -- 15.14 Evidence in civil proceedings -- 15.15 Costs -- 15.16 Enforcement of judgments and orders -- 16 Criminal and civil appeals -- 16.1 Criminal appeals -- 16.2 Civil appeals -- 17 Tribunals and alternative dispute resolution -- 17.1 Tribunals -- 17.2 Arbitration -- 17.3 Mediation -- 17.4 Other forms of ADR -- 17.5 Courts powers to 'stay' litigation -- 17.6 Problems with court hearings -- 17.7 Advantages of ADR -- 17.8 Disadvantages of ADR.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

1 Studying English legal system -- 1.1 From 'A' level to degree study -- 1.2 Advice on studying the English legal system -- 1.3 Lectures -- 1.4 Preparing for seminars or tutorials -- 1.5 Assessment -- 1.6 A note about group work -- 1.7 Oral presentations -- 1.8 Examinations -- 2 English legal system-an overview -- 2.1 What is law?-some basic ideas -- 2.2 Common law and equity -- 2.3 Parliament and legislation -- 2.4 Criminal law and civil law-terminology, differences, and themes -- 2.5 Classification of the courts -- 2.6 Legal personnel and bodies -- 3 Legislation and the law-making process -- 3.1 Parliament -- 3.2 Primary legislation -- 3.3 The passage of legislation through Parliament

3.4 Resolving inter-House conflicts using the Parliament Act procedure -- 3.5 Secondary legislation -- 4 The interpretation of statutes -- 4.1 Problems of language -- 4.2 Preliminary issues -- 4.3 The traditional approach to statutory interpretation -- 4.4 Aids to construction -- 4.5 Rules of language -- 4.6 Presumptions of statutory intent -- 4.7 Interpretation of legislation and the European Union -- 4.8 Interpretation of legislation and the Human Rights Act 1998 -- 5 The doctrine of judicial precedent -- 5.1 Judicial precedent and law reporting -- 5.2 Nature of judge-made law -- 5.3 Ratio decidendi -- 5.4 Obiter dicta -- 5.5 Nature of stare decisis -- 5.6 Methods of avoiding precedents -- 5.7 Nature of the rules of Judicial precedent

5.8 Case analysis -- 6 The law and institutions of the European Union -- 6.1 The History of the European Union -- 6.2 The institutions of the EU -- 6.3 Sources of EU law -- 6.4 The preliminary rulings procedure -- 6.5 Supremacy of EU law -- 6.6 Direct effect -- 6.7 State liability -- 7 Human rights and fundamental freedoms -- 7.1 The European Convention on Human Rights and the incorporation of Convention rights into UK law -- 7.2 Parliamentary sovereignty and the European Convention on Human Rights -- 7.3 Interpretation of legislation under section 3 -- 7.4 Declaration of incompatibility -- 7.5 Statements of compatibility in Parliament -- 7.6 Remedying incompatibility -- 7.7 The UK courts and the European Court of Human Rights

7.8 Unlawful for a public authority to act incompatibly with Convention rights -- 8 The Judiciary -- 8.1 The Judicial hierarchy -- 8.2 Appointment of the judiciary -- 8.3 Removal and retirement -- 8.4 Judicial independence -- 8.5 Governance of the judiciary -- 9 The legal profession -- 9.1 The legal profession -- 9.2 Solicitors -- 9.3 Barristers -- 9.4 Regulation of the professions and reform: The Clementi Review -- 9.5 Should the professions of barrister and solicitor be amalgamated? -- 9.6 Legal executives -- 9.7 Licened conveyancers -- 9.8 Paralegals -- 10 The jury -- 10.1 The role of the jury -- 10.2 The selection of the jury -- 10.3 Challenges to jury membership

10.4 Jury vetting -- 10.5 The ethnic composition of the jury -- 10.6 Jury intimidation or 'tampering' -- 10.7 Juries in serious fraud trials -- 10.8 Jury waiver -- 10.9 Jurors, social media, and the internet -- 10.10 Advantages of jury trials -- 10.11 Disadvantages -- 11 Access to justice -- 11.1 Legal Aid Agency -- 11.2 Civil Legal Advice Service -- 11.3 Criminal legal aid -- 11.4 Recent history of legal aid reform -- 12 The criminal process: the suspect and the police -- 12.1 The structure and organisation of the police -- 12.2 PACE and the Codes of Practice -- 12.3 Police powers to search, seize property, and make arrests -- 12.4 The suspect at the police station -- 12.5 Charging a detainee and the decision to prosecute

13 The criminal process: pre-trial and trial -- 13.1 The criminal courts of trial and the classification of offences -- 13.2 Instituting criminal proceedings -- 13.3 The Auld Review -- 13.4 The Criminal Procedure Rules 2013 -- 13.5 First hearings -- 13.6 Pre-trial hearings: summary only offences -- 13.7 Pre-trial hearings: either way offences -- 13.8 Pre-trial hearings: indictable only offences -- 13.9 Plea and Case Management Hearings in the Crown Court -- 13.10 Indictments -- 13.11 Plea bargaining -- 13.12 Bail -- 13.13 Pre-trial issues: disclosure -- 13.14 Trial on indictment -- 13.15 Summary trial -- 13.16 Evidential issues -- 13.17 Verdicts-- 14 Sentencing

14.1 Statutary provisions governing the sentencing of offenders -- 14.2 The purposes of sentencing -- 14.3 Maximum sentences -- 14.4 Determining the appropriate sentence -- 14.5 Newton hearings -- 14.6 Offences taken into consideration -- 14.7 Types of sentence -- 14.8 Sentencing youths -- 15 The civil process -- 15.1 The nature of civil proceedings -- 15.2 The Woolf reforms -- 15.3 The civil courts -- 15.4 Case management powers -- 15.5 Commencing civil proceedings -- 15.6 Responding to particulars of claim, acknowledgement of service, admissions, and default judgments -- 15.7 Allocation and case management tracks -- 15.8 The disclosure and inspection of documents

15.9 Part 36 offers -- 15.10 Qualified One Way Costs Shifting -- 15.11 Applying for court orders -- 15.12 Summary judgment -- 15.13 Civil trial -- 15.14 Evidence in civil proceedings -- 15.15 Costs -- 15.16 Enforcement of judgments and orders -- 16 Criminal and civil appeals -- 16.1 Criminal appeals -- 16.2 Civil appeals -- 17 Tribunals and alternative dispute resolution -- 17.1 Tribunals -- 17.2 Arbitration -- 17.3 Mediation -- 17.4 Other forms of ADR -- 17.5 Courts powers to 'stay' litigation -- 17.6 Problems with court hearings -- 17.7 Advantages of ADR -- 17.8 Disadvantages of ADR.

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