Virtuous violence : hurting and killing to create, sustain, end, and honor social relationships / Alan Page Fiske and Tage Shakti Rai.  (Text) (Text)

Fiske, Alan Page, 1947-
Rai, Tage Shakti
Call no.: HM1116 .F57 2015Publication: Cambridge, U.K. : Cambridge University Press, 2015Description: xxvi, 357 pISBN: 9781107458918 (pbk.); 1107458919 (pbk.); 9781107088207 (hardback); 1107088208 (hardback)Subject(s): ViolenceViolence -- Moral and ethical aspectsLOC classification: HM1116 | .F57 2015
Contents:The point -- 1. Why are people violent? : What we mean by "violence" ; Natural aversion to killing and hurting ; What we mean by "moral" ; Conflicting moralities and post-hoc justifications ; Pain and suffering are not intrinsically evil ; Forerunners of virtuous violence theory and how it goes beyond them ; Scope: What we are and are not discussing ; Illegitimate, immoral violence -- 2. Violence is morally motivated to regulate social relationships : Fundamental ways of relating: the four elementary relational models ; Cultural implementations of universal models ; Constitutive phases ; Metarelational models -- 3. Defense, punishment, and vengeance : Defense and punishment ; Vengeance ; Metarelational retribution ; Violence due to conflicting models -- 4. The right and obligation of parents, police, kings, and gods to violently enforce their authority : Corporal punishment of children ; Violence in the military ; Violent policing ; Violence by gods ; Explanations of accidents, misfortune, and suffering ; Trial by ordeal and combat ; Metarelational aspects of authority-ranking violence -- 5. Contests of violence: fighting for respect and solidarity : Knighthood in medieval Europe ; Gang and criminal cultures ; Fighting among and alongside the gods ; Sports ; Fighting among youths ; Metarelational aspects of fighting for respect and solidarity -- 6. Honor and shame : Guest-host relationship ; Honor killing ; Honor violence in the United States ; Honor among thieves ; How the metarelational honor model organized the violence of the Trojan War -- 7. War : The motives of leaders and nations ; The moral motives that move soldiers to go to war ; Killing under orders ; Killing for your comrades ; Extremist violence and terrorism -- 8. Violence to obey, honor, and connect with the gods : Gods command violence ; Sacrificing animals and humans to the gods ; Self-sacrifice to the gods ; China ; American Indians ; Christian monastic asceticism ; Christian and Muslim self-flagellation ; Theoretical elaboration -- 9. On relational morality: what are its boundaries, what guides it, and how is it computed? : Defining the moral space ; Distinguishing between moral and immoral relationship regulation ; What are the cultural preos delimiting violence? ; Going beyond the culturally prescribed limits to violence ; Is morally motivated violence rational and deliberative or emotional and impulsive? -- 10. The prevailing wisdom : Are most killers sadists and psychopaths? ; Are killers rational? ; Are killers impulsive? ; Are killers mistaken? -- 11. Intimate partner violence : Intimate partner violence is widespread ; Intimate partner violence is morally motivated to regulate relationships -- 12. Rape : Rape in war ; Gang rape -- 13. Making them one with us: initiation, clitoridectomy, infibulation, circumcision, and castration : Initiation rites ; Circumcision and excision ; Eunuch opportunities -- 14. Torture : Motives of leaders who order torture ; Motives of torturers ; Motives of the public that approves of the use of torture -- 15. Homicide: he had it coming : How many homicides are morally motivated? ; Mass murder ; Homicides committed by the mentally ill ; Metarelational motives for homicide -- 16. Ethnic violence and genocide : Violence against African-Americans in the US South ; Genocide ; Null attitudes and dehumanization in the perpetuation of mass violence -- 17. Self-harm and suicide : Non-suicidal self-injury ; Suicide -- 18. Violent bereavement : Why are people sometimes enraged by death? -- 19. Non-bodily violence: robbery : Robbery for equality-matching vengeance ; Robbery for authority-ranking status -- 20. The specific form of violence for constituting each relational model : Communal sharing violence: indexical consubstantial assimilation ; Authority-ranking violence: iconic physics of magnitudes and dimensions ; Equality-matching violence: concrete ostensive operations ; Market-pricing violence: arbitrary conventional symbolism -- 21. Why do people use violence to constitute their social relationships, rather than using some other medium? : Criticality -- 22. Metarelational models that inhibit or provide alternatives to violence -- 23. How do we end violence? : Civil disobedience and hunger strikes ; Urban gang homicide -- 24. Evolutionary, philosophical, legal, psychological, and research implications : Evolution ; Philosophy ; Law ; Psychology ; Research -- The dénouement : What do we mean by "most" violence? ; The need for general explanations.
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General Books General Stacks HM1116 .F57 2015 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) ยืมออก 04/01/2022 31379014946165
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The point -- 1. Why are people violent? : What we mean by "violence" ; Natural aversion to killing and hurting ; What we mean by "moral" ; Conflicting moralities and post-hoc justifications ; Pain and suffering are not intrinsically evil ; Forerunners of virtuous violence theory and how it goes beyond them ; Scope: What we are and are not discussing ; Illegitimate, immoral violence -- 2. Violence is morally motivated to regulate social relationships : Fundamental ways of relating: the four elementary relational models ; Cultural implementations of universal models ; Constitutive phases ; Metarelational models -- 3. Defense, punishment, and vengeance : Defense and punishment ; Vengeance ; Metarelational retribution ; Violence due to conflicting models -- 4. The right and obligation of parents, police, kings, and gods to violently enforce their authority : Corporal punishment of children ; Violence in the military ; Violent policing ; Violence by gods ; Explanations of accidents, misfortune, and suffering ; Trial by ordeal and combat ; Metarelational aspects of authority-ranking violence -- 5. Contests of violence: fighting for respect and solidarity : Knighthood in medieval Europe ; Gang and criminal cultures ; Fighting among and alongside the gods ; Sports ; Fighting among youths ; Metarelational aspects of fighting for respect and solidarity -- 6. Honor and shame : Guest-host relationship ; Honor killing ; Honor violence in the United States ; Honor among thieves ; How the metarelational honor model organized the violence of the Trojan War -- 7. War : The motives of leaders and nations ; The moral motives that move soldiers to go to war ; Killing under orders ; Killing for your comrades ; Extremist violence and terrorism -- 8. Violence to obey, honor, and connect with the gods : Gods command violence ; Sacrificing animals and humans to the gods ; Self-sacrifice to the gods ; China ; American Indians ; Christian monastic asceticism ; Christian and Muslim self-flagellation ; Theoretical elaboration -- 9. On relational morality: what are its boundaries, what guides it, and how is it computed? : Defining the moral space ; Distinguishing between moral and immoral relationship regulation ; What are the cultural preos delimiting violence? ; Going beyond the culturally prescribed limits to violence ; Is morally motivated violence rational and deliberative or emotional and impulsive? -- 10. The prevailing wisdom : Are most killers sadists and psychopaths? ; Are killers rational? ; Are killers impulsive? ; Are killers mistaken? -- 11. Intimate partner violence : Intimate partner violence is widespread ; Intimate partner violence is morally motivated to regulate relationships -- 12. Rape : Rape in war ; Gang rape -- 13. Making them one with us: initiation, clitoridectomy, infibulation, circumcision, and castration : Initiation rites ; Circumcision and excision ; Eunuch opportunities -- 14. Torture : Motives of leaders who order torture ; Motives of torturers ; Motives of the public that approves of the use of torture -- 15. Homicide: he had it coming : How many homicides are morally motivated? ; Mass murder ; Homicides committed by the mentally ill ; Metarelational motives for homicide -- 16. Ethnic violence and genocide : Violence against African-Americans in the US South ; Genocide ; Null attitudes and dehumanization in the perpetuation of mass violence -- 17. Self-harm and suicide : Non-suicidal self-injury ; Suicide -- 18. Violent bereavement : Why are people sometimes enraged by death? -- 19. Non-bodily violence: robbery : Robbery for equality-matching vengeance ; Robbery for authority-ranking status -- 20. The specific form of violence for constituting each relational model : Communal sharing violence: indexical consubstantial assimilation ; Authority-ranking violence: iconic physics of magnitudes and dimensions ; Equality-matching violence: concrete ostensive operations ; Market-pricing violence: arbitrary conventional symbolism -- 21. Why do people use violence to constitute their social relationships, rather than using some other medium? : Criticality -- 22. Metarelational models that inhibit or provide alternatives to violence -- 23. How do we end violence? : Civil disobedience and hunger strikes ; Urban gang homicide -- 24. Evolutionary, philosophical, legal, psychological, and research implications : Evolution ; Philosophy ; Law ; Psychology ; Research -- The dénouement : What do we mean by "most" violence? ; The need for general explanations.

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