Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Sovereignty and the sea : how Indonesia became an archipelagic state / John G. Butcher and R.E. Elson.

By: Butcher, John G.
Contributor(s): Elson, R. E. (Robert Edward), 1947-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCall no.: KZA1146.I5 B88 2020Publication: Singapore : NUS Press, National University of Singapore, 2020Description: xxviii, 527 p.: ill., maps.Notes: Reprint. Originally published: 2017.ISBN: 9789813250086 (pbk.); 9813250089 (pbk.); 9789814722216 (case); 9814722219 (case).Subject(s): Territorial waters -- Indonesia | Law of the sea -- Indonesia
Contents:
List of figures ix -- List of photographs xi -- Abbreviations used in the text and notes xii -- Abbreviated references to frequently cited proposals, negotiating texts, and conventions xiv -- Glossary of technical terms xvi -- Preface xx -- Acknowledgements xxvi -- Chapter 1 The "sea territory" of the Netherlands Indies 1 -- Chapter 2 The Territorial Sea and Maritime Districts Ordinance 26 -- Chapter 3 The declaration 46 -- Chapter 4 Geneva 1958 77 -- Chapter 5 Regulation No.4 of 1960 98 -- Chapter 6 Confrontations 115 -- Chapter 7 A new beginning 135 -- Chapter 8 The Seabed Committee 1971-72 167 -- Chapter 9 The Seabed Committee 1973 199 -- Chapter 10 Preparing for Caracas 226 -- Chapter 11 Caracas 1974 247 -- Chapter 12 Negotiating with the United States 269 -- Chapter 13 Geneva 1975 289 -- Chapter 14 New York, spring 1976 317 -- Chapter 15 New York, summer 1976 350 -- Chapter 16 New York 1977 363 -- Chapter 17 To Montego Bay 393 -- Chapter 18 Reflections on the diplomatic campaign 421 -- Chapter 19 Epilogue 427 -- Notes 435 -- Notes on figures 501 -- Notes on photographs 505 -- Select bibliography 506 -- Index 515.
Summary: "Until the mid-1950s nearly all of the sea between the far-flung islands of the Indonesian archipelago was open to ships of all nations, but in 1957, the Indonesian government declared that it had absolute sovereignty over all the waters lying within straight baselines drawn between the outermost islands of Indonesia. In this single step, Indonesia made its lands and seas a unified entity for the first time, a claim formally recognized in 1982 by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Sovereignty and the Sea explores how Indonesia succeeded in its extraordinary claim despite its low international profile. John G. Butcher and R. E. Elson reveal that at the heart of Indonesia's archipelagic campaign was a small group of Indonesian diplomats whose dogged persistence, negotiating skills, and willingness to make difficult compromises resulted in Indonesia becoming the greatest archipelagic state in the world."
List(s) this item appears in: TUPRIDI-NewBook-2020-03-01(Foreign)
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Pridi Banomyong Library
General Stacks
General Books KZA1146.I5 B88 2020 (See Similar Items) Show map Available 31379015930366
Total holds: 0

Reprint. Originally published: 2017.

List of figures ix -- List of photographs xi -- Abbreviations used in the text and notes xii -- Abbreviated references to frequently cited proposals, negotiating texts, and conventions xiv -- Glossary of technical terms xvi -- Preface xx -- Acknowledgements xxvi -- Chapter 1 The "sea territory" of the Netherlands Indies 1 -- Chapter 2 The Territorial Sea and Maritime Districts Ordinance 26 -- Chapter 3 The declaration 46 -- Chapter 4 Geneva 1958 77 -- Chapter 5 Regulation No.4 of 1960 98 -- Chapter 6 Confrontations 115 -- Chapter 7 A new beginning 135 -- Chapter 8 The Seabed Committee 1971-72 167 -- Chapter 9 The Seabed Committee 1973 199 -- Chapter 10 Preparing for Caracas 226 -- Chapter 11 Caracas 1974 247 -- Chapter 12 Negotiating with the United States 269 -- Chapter 13 Geneva 1975 289 -- Chapter 14 New York, spring 1976 317 -- Chapter 15 New York, summer 1976 350 -- Chapter 16 New York 1977 363 -- Chapter 17 To Montego Bay 393 -- Chapter 18 Reflections on the diplomatic campaign 421 -- Chapter 19 Epilogue 427 -- Notes 435 -- Notes on figures 501 -- Notes on photographs 505 -- Select bibliography 506 -- Index 515.

"Until the mid-1950s nearly all of the sea between the far-flung islands of the Indonesian archipelago was open to ships of all nations, but in 1957, the Indonesian government declared that it had absolute sovereignty over all the waters lying within straight baselines drawn between the outermost islands of Indonesia. In this single step, Indonesia made its lands and seas a unified entity for the first time, a claim formally recognized in 1982 by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Sovereignty and the Sea explores how Indonesia succeeded in its extraordinary claim despite its low international profile. John G. Butcher and R. E. Elson reveal that at the heart of Indonesia's archipelagic campaign was a small group of Indonesian diplomats whose dogged persistence, negotiating skills, and willingness to make difficult compromises resulted in Indonesia becoming the greatest archipelagic state in the world."

There are no comments for this item.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer

Open Library:

Thammasat University Library
2 Prachan Road, Phranakorn, Bangkok 10200
Tel: 662 613-3544 (Pridi Banomyong Library, Circulation Desk)
Tel: 662 564-4444 ext. 1305 (Puey Ungphakorn Library (Rangsit Campus), Circulation Desk)