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Political theory and architecture / edited by Duncan Bell and Bernardo Zacka.

Contributor(s): Bell, Duncan, 1976- | Zacka, Bernardo, 1983-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCall no.: NA100 .P65 2020Publication: London : Bloomsbury Academic, 2020Description: vi, 311 p. : ill.ISBN: 1350096598 (hardback); 9781350096592 (hardback).Subject(s): Architecture and state | Architecture and society | Architecture -- Political aspects
Contents:
Part 1. Architecture and political regimes. What (if anything) is "democratic architecture"? /Jan-Werner Müller -- Fortifications and democracy in the ancient Greek world / Josiah Ober and Barry Weingast -- Plato's Magnesia and Costa's Brasilia -- Part 2. Architecture as constitutive of political space. What's in a balcony? The in-between as public good / Bernardo Zacka -- Durability and citizenship: toward an Arendtian political philosophy of architecture / Ronald Beiner -- The soft power of neighbors: proximity, scale, and responses to violence / Nancy L. Rosenblum -- Part 3. Architecture as infrastructure: governmentality and political economy. Scripting the city: J. G. Ballard among the architects / Duncan Bell -- Architecture as government / Ali Aslam -- Making superstar cities work: Jane Jacobs in Toronto / Margaret Kohn -- Whose right to the city? Lessons from the Territorial Rights Debate / Benjamin Hofmann -- Part 4. The political agency of architecture. Can architecture really do nothing? Lefebvre, Bloch, and Jameson on utopia / Nathaniel Coleman -- The architecture of political renewal / Mihaela Mihai -- The modesty of architecture / Randall Lindstrom and Jeff Malpas -- Architecture, materiality, and politics: sensations, symbols, situations, and decors / Antoine Picon -- Epilogue: Top-down/ bottom-up: co-producing the city / Fonna Forman.
Summary: "What can political theory teach us about architecture, and what can it learn from paying closer attention to architecture? The essays assembled in this volume begin from a common postulate: that architecture is not merely a backdrop to political life but a political force in its own right. Each in their own way, they aim to give countenance to that claim, and to show how our thinking about politics can be enriched by reflecting on the built environment. The collection advances four lines of inquiry, probing the connection between architecture and political regimes; examining how architecture can be constitutive of the ethical and political realm; uncovering how architecture is enmeshed in logics of governmentality and in the political economy of the city; and asking to what extent we can think of architecture-tributary as it is to the flows of capital-as a partially autonomous social force. Taken together, the essays demonstrate the salience of a range of political theoretical approaches for the analysis of architecture, and show that architecture deserves a place as an object of study in political theory, alongside institutions, laws, norms, practices, imaginaries, and discourses."--
List(s) this item appears in: TUPOL-New Book-2020 09
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Book Book Professor Direk Jayanama Library
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General Books NA100 .P65 2020 (See Similar Items) Checked out 31/01/2021 31379015766679
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part 1. Architecture and political regimes. What (if anything) is "democratic architecture"? /Jan-Werner Müller -- Fortifications and democracy in the ancient Greek world / Josiah Ober and Barry Weingast -- Plato's Magnesia and Costa's Brasilia -- Part 2. Architecture as constitutive of political space. What's in a balcony? The in-between as public good / Bernardo Zacka -- Durability and citizenship: toward an Arendtian political philosophy of architecture / Ronald Beiner -- The soft power of neighbors: proximity, scale, and responses to violence / Nancy L. Rosenblum -- Part 3. Architecture as infrastructure: governmentality and political economy. Scripting the city: J. G. Ballard among the architects / Duncan Bell -- Architecture as government / Ali Aslam -- Making superstar cities work: Jane Jacobs in Toronto / Margaret Kohn -- Whose right to the city? Lessons from the Territorial Rights Debate / Benjamin Hofmann -- Part 4. The political agency of architecture. Can architecture really do nothing? Lefebvre, Bloch, and Jameson on utopia / Nathaniel Coleman -- The architecture of political renewal / Mihaela Mihai -- The modesty of architecture / Randall Lindstrom and Jeff Malpas -- Architecture, materiality, and politics: sensations, symbols, situations, and decors / Antoine Picon -- Epilogue: Top-down/ bottom-up: co-producing the city / Fonna Forman.

"What can political theory teach us about architecture, and what can it learn from paying closer attention to architecture? The essays assembled in this volume begin from a common postulate: that architecture is not merely a backdrop to political life but a political force in its own right. Each in their own way, they aim to give countenance to that claim, and to show how our thinking about politics can be enriched by reflecting on the built environment. The collection advances four lines of inquiry, probing the connection between architecture and political regimes; examining how architecture can be constitutive of the ethical and political realm; uncovering how architecture is enmeshed in logics of governmentality and in the political economy of the city; and asking to what extent we can think of architecture-tributary as it is to the flows of capital-as a partially autonomous social force. Taken together, the essays demonstrate the salience of a range of political theoretical approaches for the analysis of architecture, and show that architecture deserves a place as an object of study in political theory, alongside institutions, laws, norms, practices, imaginaries, and discourses."--

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