No place for Russia : European security institutions since 1989 / William H. Hill.  (Text) (Text)

Hill, William H. (William Holway), 1945-
Call no.: UA646 .H55 2018Series: Woodrow Wilson Center series: Publication: New York : Columbia University Press, c2018Description: ix, 519 pISBN: 9780231704588 (hardcover); 0231704585 (hardcover)Other title: European security institutions since 1989 [Portion of title]Subject(s): National security -- EuropeSecurity, InternationalRussia (Federation) -- Foreign relations -- EuropeEurope -- Foreign relations -- Russia (Federation)LOC classification: UA646 | .H55 2018
Contents:From a Europe divided to a Europe whole and free -- Building the New World Order, 1990-1991 -- Building the new institutions : NATO, the EU, and the OSCE -- NATO and the EU move east : extending stability, or new divisions? -- War over Kosovo : the parting of the ways -- New millennium, new threats -- Colors of revolution, rivalry, and discord -- Russia leaves the West : from Kosovo to Georgia -- The reset : one more try -- Things fall apart-again! -- Confrontation in Ukraine : war in Europe again -- The future of European security : the past as present.
Summary: "The book studies Russia's place in European security institutions since the end of the Cold War. Hill argues that neither Russia, the major European powers, nor the United States has been able to define a place for Russia in the network of European and Euro-Atlantic security institutions. The author looks at the larger process of transforming and building an interlocking structure of institutions, in particular the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the European Union (EU), and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). The work proceeds chronologically, beginning with a summary of the Cold War and the status of institutions in 1989. Its general story is that the US used NATO, which excludes Russia, to retain a leading role in world politics; that the enlargement after 1999 of NATO and the EU, which also excludes Russia, alienated Russia from European security structures; that the significance of Russia's membership in the CSCE/OSCE diminished as western leaders gradually focused more and more on NATO and the EU. Hill traces events through the Kosovo War, the Arab spring, and the confrontation over Ukraine, citing how Russia, the United States, NATO, the EU, and the OSCE have reacted to events and to each other. In the end, with Ukraine, the OSCE is still present but its effectiveness is unclear, while these events test the already troubled EU and reinvigorate the original purpose of NATO. The book will also include a glossary of abbreviations, acronyms, and technical terms used in the manuscript, plus a basic chronology of key events and meetings"--
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General Books General Stacks UA646 .H55 2018 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) ยืมออก 31/08/2021 31379015766901
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

From a Europe divided to a Europe whole and free -- Building the New World Order, 1990-1991 -- Building the new institutions : NATO, the EU, and the OSCE -- NATO and the EU move east : extending stability, or new divisions? -- War over Kosovo : the parting of the ways -- New millennium, new threats -- Colors of revolution, rivalry, and discord -- Russia leaves the West : from Kosovo to Georgia -- The reset : one more try -- Things fall apart-again! -- Confrontation in Ukraine : war in Europe again -- The future of European security : the past as present.

"The book studies Russia's place in European security institutions since the end of the Cold War. Hill argues that neither Russia, the major European powers, nor the United States has been able to define a place for Russia in the network of European and Euro-Atlantic security institutions. The author looks at the larger process of transforming and building an interlocking structure of institutions, in particular the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the European Union (EU), and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). The work proceeds chronologically, beginning with a summary of the Cold War and the status of institutions in 1989. Its general story is that the US used NATO, which excludes Russia, to retain a leading role in world politics; that the enlargement after 1999 of NATO and the EU, which also excludes Russia, alienated Russia from European security structures; that the significance of Russia's membership in the CSCE/OSCE diminished as western leaders gradually focused more and more on NATO and the EU. Hill traces events through the Kosovo War, the Arab spring, and the confrontation over Ukraine, citing how Russia, the United States, NATO, the EU, and the OSCE have reacted to events and to each other. In the end, with Ukraine, the OSCE is still present but its effectiveness is unclear, while these events test the already troubled EU and reinvigorate the original purpose of NATO. The book will also include a glossary of abbreviations, acronyms, and technical terms used in the manuscript, plus a basic chronology of key events and meetings"--

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