How we became our data : a genealogy of the informational person / Colin Koopman.  (Text) (Text)

Koopman, Colin
Call no.: Z665 .K66 2019Publication: Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 2019Description: x, 269 p. : illISBN: 9780226626581 (paperback); 022662658X (paperback); 9780226626444 (cloth); 022662644X (cloth)Subject(s): Information science -- Social aspects -- United StatesInformation society -- United States -- Psychological aspectsInformation technology -- Social aspects -- United StatesLOC classification: Z665 | .K66 2019
Contents:Introduction: initialization -- Informational persons and our information politics -- Histories of information -- Inputs. "Human bookkeeping": the informatics of documentary identity, 1913-1937 -- Processes. Algorithmic personality: the informatics of psychological traits, 1917-1937 -- Outputs. Segregating data: the informatics of racialized credit, 1923-1937 -- Powers of formatting -- Diagnostics. Toward a political theory for informational persons -- Redesign. Data's turbulent pasts and future paths.
Summary: We are now acutely aware, as if all of the sudden, that data matters enormously to how we live. How did information come to be so integral to what we can do? How did we become people who effortlessly present our lives in social media profiles and who are meticulously recorded in state surveillance dossiers and online marketing databases? What is the story behind data coming to matter so much to who we are? Colin Koopman excavates early moments of our rapidly accelerating data-tracking technologies and their consequences for how we think of and express our selfhood today. Koopman explores the emergence of mass-scale record keeping systems like birth certificates and social security numbers, as well as new data techniques for categorizing personality traits, measuring intelligence, and even racializing subjects. This all culminates in what Koopman calls the "informational person" and the "informational power" we are now subject to. The recent explosion of digital technologies that are turning us into a series of algorithmic data points is shown to have a deeper and more turbulent past than we commonly think. Blending philosophy, history, political theory, and media theory in conversation with thinkers like Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, and Friedrich Kittler, Koopman presents an illuminating perspective on how we have come to think of our personhood - and how we can resist its erosion.
แสดงรายการนี้ใน: TUPOL-New Book-2020 11
แท็ก: ไม่มีแท็กจากห้องสมุดสำหรับชื่อเรื่องนี้ เข้าสู่ระบบเพื่อเพิ่มแท็ก
ประเภททรัพยากร ตำแหน่งปัจจุบัน กลุ่มข้อมูล ตำแหน่งชั้นหนังสือ เลขเรียกหนังสือ สถานะ วันกำหนดส่ง บาร์โค้ด การจองรายการ
Book Book Professor Direk Jayanama Library
General Books General Stacks Z665 .K66 2019 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) ยืมออก 31/01/2022 31379015767446
รายการจองทั้งหมด: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 203-261) and index.

Introduction: initialization -- Informational persons and our information politics -- Histories of information -- Inputs. "Human bookkeeping": the informatics of documentary identity, 1913-1937 -- Processes. Algorithmic personality: the informatics of psychological traits, 1917-1937 -- Outputs. Segregating data: the informatics of racialized credit, 1923-1937 -- Powers of formatting -- Diagnostics. Toward a political theory for informational persons -- Redesign. Data's turbulent pasts and future paths.

We are now acutely aware, as if all of the sudden, that data matters enormously to how we live. How did information come to be so integral to what we can do? How did we become people who effortlessly present our lives in social media profiles and who are meticulously recorded in state surveillance dossiers and online marketing databases? What is the story behind data coming to matter so much to who we are? Colin Koopman excavates early moments of our rapidly accelerating data-tracking technologies and their consequences for how we think of and express our selfhood today. Koopman explores the emergence of mass-scale record keeping systems like birth certificates and social security numbers, as well as new data techniques for categorizing personality traits, measuring intelligence, and even racializing subjects. This all culminates in what Koopman calls the "informational person" and the "informational power" we are now subject to. The recent explosion of digital technologies that are turning us into a series of algorithmic data points is shown to have a deeper and more turbulent past than we commonly think. Blending philosophy, history, political theory, and media theory in conversation with thinkers like Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, and Friedrich Kittler, Koopman presents an illuminating perspective on how we have come to think of our personhood - and how we can resist its erosion.

There are no comments on this title.

เพื่อโพสต์ความคิดเห็น

คลิกที่รูปภาพเพื่อดูในตัวแสดงภาพ

ห้องสมุด:

Thammasat University Library, 2 Prachan Road, Phranakorn, Bangkok 10200

Puey Ungphakorn Library (Rangsit Campus), Circulation Desk 662 564-4444 ext. 1305

Pridi Banomyong Library, Circulation Desk 662 613-3544