A history of manners and civility in Thailand / Patrick Jory.  (Text) (Text)

Jory, Patrick
Call no.: BJ2007.T53 J67 2021Publication: Cambridge, U.K. : Cambridge University Press, 2021Description: x, 269 p. : illISBN: 9781108491242; 1108491243; 9781108811774; 1108811779Subject(s): Etiquette -- Thailand -- HistoryHabitus (Sociology)Conduct of life -- Religious aspects -- BuddhismBuddhism -- Social aspects -- ThailandThailand -- Social life and customsLOC classification: BJ2007.T53 | J67 2021
Contents:Introduction. Manners and the Thai habitus -- Buddhist ethics of conduct and self control -- Manners and the monarchy : prostration and civilization -- The making of the gentleperson -- Manners in a time of revolution -- From courtiers to ladies -- Royalist reaction : Thai manners as submission -- The passing of the gentleperson -- Manners in Thailand's civilizing process.
Summary: "Aristocrats, prime ministers, monks, army generals, politicians, poets, novelists, journalists and teachers have produced a large corpus of literature that sets out models of appropriate behaviour. It teaches such things as how to stand, walk, sit, pay homage, prostrate oneself and crawl in the presence of high-status people, sleep, eat, manage bodily functions, dress, pay respect to superiors, deal with inferiors, socialize, use one's time, work, and play. These modes of conduct have been taught or enforced by families, the monastery, court society, and, in the twentieth century, the state, through the education system, the bureaucracy, and the mass media. Modern thinking about manners, despite the outwardly secular ends to which it is directed, contains within it echoes of an older Buddhist theory about how to master the self that teaches control of bodily action (kai), speech (waja), and one's mental disposition (jai). The inculcation of good manners thus has as its objective the shaping of the whole person. This book is the first to examine how models of good behaviour in Thailand were formed historically, dating from the early nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century"--
แท็ก: ไม่มีแท็กจากห้องสมุดสำหรับชื่อเรื่องนี้ เข้าสู่ระบบเพื่อเพิ่มแท็ก
ประเภททรัพยากร ตำแหน่งปัจจุบัน กลุ่มข้อมูล ตำแหน่งชั้นหนังสือ เลขเรียกหนังสือ สถานะ วันกำหนดส่ง บาร์โค้ด การจองรายการ
Book Book Pridi Banomyong Library
General Books General Stacks BJ2007.T53 J67 2021 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) Show map ยืมออก 25/12/2021 31379016092182
รายการจองทั้งหมด: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction. Manners and the Thai habitus -- Buddhist ethics of conduct and self control -- Manners and the monarchy : prostration and civilization -- The making of the gentleperson -- Manners in a time of revolution -- From courtiers to ladies -- Royalist reaction : Thai manners as submission -- The passing of the gentleperson -- Manners in Thailand's civilizing process.

"Aristocrats, prime ministers, monks, army generals, politicians, poets, novelists, journalists and teachers have produced a large corpus of literature that sets out models of appropriate behaviour. It teaches such things as how to stand, walk, sit, pay homage, prostrate oneself and crawl in the presence of high-status people, sleep, eat, manage bodily functions, dress, pay respect to superiors, deal with inferiors, socialize, use one's time, work, and play. These modes of conduct have been taught or enforced by families, the monastery, court society, and, in the twentieth century, the state, through the education system, the bureaucracy, and the mass media. Modern thinking about manners, despite the outwardly secular ends to which it is directed, contains within it echoes of an older Buddhist theory about how to master the self that teaches control of bodily action (kai), speech (waja), and one's mental disposition (jai). The inculcation of good manners thus has as its objective the shaping of the whole person. This book is the first to examine how models of good behaviour in Thailand were formed historically, dating from the early nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century"--

There are no comments on this title.

เพื่อโพสต์ความคิดเห็น

คลิกที่รูปภาพเพื่อดูในตัวแสดงภาพ

ห้องสมุด:

Thammasat University Library, 2 Prachan Road, Phranakorn, Bangkok 10200

Puey Ungphakorn Library (Rangsit Campus), Circulation Desk 662 564-4444 ext. 1305

Pridi Banomyong Library, Circulation Desk 662 613-3544