Accessible America : a history of disability and design / Bess Williamson.  (Text) (Text)

Williamson, Bess
Call no.: HV1553 .W555 2020Publication: New York : New York University Press, 2020Description: vii, 279 p. : illISBN: 9781479802494; 1479802492Subject(s): People with disabilities -- United States -- HistoryBarrier-free design -- United StatesUniversal design -- United StatesLOC classification: HV1553 | .W555 2020
Contents:Introduction: Disability, design and rights in the twentieth century -- Progress through prosthetics: limbs, carts, houses and the American dream -- Disability in the century of the gadget: rehabilitation and access in postwar America -- Electric moms and quad drivers: do-it-yourself access at home in postwar America -- Berkeley, California: an independent style of access -- Kneeling to the disabled: access and backlash -- From accessible to universal :design in the late twentieth century -- Beyond ramps: cripping design -- Conclusion: design for all?.
Summary: Have you ever hit the big blue button to activate automatic doors? Have you ever used an ergonomic kitchen tool? Have you ever used curb cuts to roll a stroller across an intersection? If you have, then you've benefited from accessible design - design for people with physical, sensory, and cognitive disabilities. These ubiquitous touchstones of modern life were once anything but. Disability advocates fought tirelessly to ensure that the needs of people with disabilities became a standard part of public design thinking. That fight took many forms worldwide, but in the United States it became a civil rights issue; activists used design to make an argument about the place of people with disabilities in public life. In the aftermath of World War II, with injured veterans returning home and the polio epidemic reaching the Oval Office, the needs of people with disabilities came forcibly into the public eye as they never had before. The U.S. became the first country to enact federal accessibility laws, beginning with the Architectural Barriers Act in 1968 and continuing through the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, bringing about a wholesale rethinking of our built environment. This progression wasn't straightforward or easy. Early legislation and design efforts were often haphazard or poorly implemented, with decidedly mixed results. Political resistance to accommodating the needs of people with disabilities was strong; so, too, was resistance among architectural and industrial designers, for whom accessible design wasn't "real" design -- Conclusion : Design for all?
แสดงรายการนี้ใน: TUPUEY-New Book-202111-01 (eng)
แท็ก: ไม่มีแท็กจากห้องสมุดสำหรับชื่อเรื่องนี้ เข้าสู่ระบบเพื่อเพิ่มแท็ก
ประเภททรัพยากร ตำแหน่งปัจจุบัน กลุ่มข้อมูล ตำแหน่งชั้นหนังสือ เลขเรียกหนังสือ สถานะ วันกำหนดส่ง บาร์โค้ด การจองรายการ
Book Book Puey Ungphakorn Library, Rangsit Campus
General Books General Stacks HV1553 .W555 2020 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) Show map พร้อมให้บริการ
3137901640918
รายการจองทั้งหมด: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-265) and index.

Introduction: Disability, design and rights in the twentieth century -- Progress through prosthetics: limbs, carts, houses and the American dream -- Disability in the century of the gadget: rehabilitation and access in postwar America -- Electric moms and quad drivers: do-it-yourself access at home in postwar America -- Berkeley, California: an independent style of access -- Kneeling to the disabled: access and backlash -- From accessible to universal :design in the late twentieth century -- Beyond ramps: cripping design -- Conclusion: design for all?.

Have you ever hit the big blue button to activate automatic doors? Have you ever used an ergonomic kitchen tool? Have you ever used curb cuts to roll a stroller across an intersection? If you have, then you've benefited from accessible design - design for people with physical, sensory, and cognitive disabilities. These ubiquitous touchstones of modern life were once anything but. Disability advocates fought tirelessly to ensure that the needs of people with disabilities became a standard part of public design thinking. That fight took many forms worldwide, but in the United States it became a civil rights issue; activists used design to make an argument about the place of people with disabilities in public life. In the aftermath of World War II, with injured veterans returning home and the polio epidemic reaching the Oval Office, the needs of people with disabilities came forcibly into the public eye as they never had before. The U.S. became the first country to enact federal accessibility laws, beginning with the Architectural Barriers Act in 1968 and continuing through the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, bringing about a wholesale rethinking of our built environment. This progression wasn't straightforward or easy. Early legislation and design efforts were often haphazard or poorly implemented, with decidedly mixed results. Political resistance to accommodating the needs of people with disabilities was strong; so, too, was resistance among architectural and industrial designers, for whom accessible design wasn't "real" design -- Conclusion : Design for all?

There are no comments on this title.

เพื่อโพสต์ความคิดเห็น

คลิกที่รูปภาพเพื่อดูในตัวแสดงภาพ

ห้องสมุด:

Thammasat University Library, 2 Prachan Road, Phranakorn, Bangkok 10200

Puey Ungphakorn Library (Rangsit Campus), Circulation Desk 662 564-4444 ext. 1305

Pridi Banomyong Library, Circulation Desk 662 613-3544