Watching Neighbours twice a day-- / Josh Widdicombe.  (Text) (Text)

Widdicombe, Josh
Call no.: PN1992.3.G7 W53 2021Publication: London : Blink, 2021Description: 328 p., 8 unnumbered p. of plates : col. illNotes: Includes index.ISBN: 9781788704359 (hbk.); 1788704355 (hbk.); 9781788704694 (pbk.); 178870469X (pbk.)Other title: Watching Neighbours twice a day-- : how '90s TV (almost) prepared me for life [Cover title]Subject(s): Widdicombe, Josh -- Childhood and youthTelevision programs -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th centuryGreat Britain -- Social life and customs -- 1945-LOC classification: PN1992.3.G7 | W53 2021
Contents:Gus Honeybun's magic birthdays -- The broom cupboard -- Badger Girl -- Kabaddi -- Gladiators -- Eldorado -- Ghostwatch -- Neighbours -- Live & kicking -- Big break -- Neighbours (again) -- Tomorrow's world -- GamesMaster -- You bet! -- Noel's house party -- 999 -- Fantasy football league -- Beadle's about -- The Brit Awards -- The X-files -- England v Germany, Euro 96 semi-final -- The Simpsons -- This is 5! -- Election 97 -- BBC News -- I'm Alan Partridge -- Commercial Break -- Ceefax -- TFI Friday -- Men behaving badly -- Total eclipse: love -- 2000 today -- Big Brother -- Epilogue.
Summary: A childhood memoir about growing up in the middle of nowhere and watching too much TV, from beloved comedian, Josh Widdicombe. 'Read any history of the Nineties in Britain and you will read about Britpop, Blair, the birth of the Premier League and the rise of new lads. I played no part in any of these events. Growing up in a tiny rural village on Dartmoor, no bands came within 100 miles, all the local farmers voted Tory, our nearest football team was in the fourth division, and the closest I got to being a new lad was when my older brother let me drink some of his Hooch.' In Watching Neighbours Twice a Day, much-loved comedian Josh Widdicombe tells the story of a strange rural childhood, the kind of childhood he only realised was weird when he left home and started telling people about it. From only having four people in his year at school, to living in a family home where they didn't just not bother locking the front door, they didn't even have a key. Using a different television show of the time as its starting point for each chapter Watching Neighbours Twice a Day is part-childhood memoir, part-comic history of 90s television and culture. It will discuss everything from the dangers of recreating Gladiators in your front room, to Josh's belief that Mr Blobby is one of the great comic characters, to being the only vegetarian child west of Bristol. Together it tells the story of the end of an era, the last time when watching television was a shared experience for the family and the nation, before the internet meant everyone watched different things at different times on different devices, headphones on to make absolutely sure no one could watch it with them.
แสดงรายการนี้ใน: TUJC-New Book-20211101
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ประเภททรัพยากร ตำแหน่งปัจจุบัน กลุ่มข้อมูล ตำแหน่งชั้นหนังสือ เลขเรียกหนังสือ สถานะ วันกำหนดส่ง บาร์โค้ด การจองรายการ
Book Book Faculty of Journalism and Mass Communication Library
General Books General Stacks PN1992.3.G7 W53 2021 (เรียกดูชั้นหนังสือ) พร้อมให้บริการ
3137901626484
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Includes index.

Gus Honeybun's magic birthdays -- The broom cupboard -- Badger Girl -- Kabaddi -- Gladiators -- Eldorado -- Ghostwatch -- Neighbours -- Live & kicking -- Big break -- Neighbours (again) -- Tomorrow's world -- GamesMaster -- You bet! -- Noel's house party -- 999 -- Fantasy football league -- Beadle's about -- The Brit Awards -- The X-files -- England v Germany, Euro 96 semi-final -- The Simpsons -- This is 5! -- Election 97 -- BBC News -- I'm Alan Partridge -- Commercial Break -- Ceefax -- TFI Friday -- Men behaving badly -- Total eclipse: love -- 2000 today -- Big Brother -- Epilogue.

A childhood memoir about growing up in the middle of nowhere and watching too much TV, from beloved comedian, Josh Widdicombe. 'Read any history of the Nineties in Britain and you will read about Britpop, Blair, the birth of the Premier League and the rise of new lads. I played no part in any of these events. Growing up in a tiny rural village on Dartmoor, no bands came within 100 miles, all the local farmers voted Tory, our nearest football team was in the fourth division, and the closest I got to being a new lad was when my older brother let me drink some of his Hooch.' In Watching Neighbours Twice a Day, much-loved comedian Josh Widdicombe tells the story of a strange rural childhood, the kind of childhood he only realised was weird when he left home and started telling people about it. From only having four people in his year at school, to living in a family home where they didn't just not bother locking the front door, they didn't even have a key. Using a different television show of the time as its starting point for each chapter Watching Neighbours Twice a Day is part-childhood memoir, part-comic history of 90s television and culture. It will discuss everything from the dangers of recreating Gladiators in your front room, to Josh's belief that Mr Blobby is one of the great comic characters, to being the only vegetarian child west of Bristol. Together it tells the story of the end of an era, the last time when watching television was a shared experience for the family and the nation, before the internet meant everyone watched different things at different times on different devices, headphones on to make absolutely sure no one could watch it with them.

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